Tuesday, September 11, 2012

2012 First Half/Second Half: Brian Haverdink


Previously: Tyler Dykstra

When I first decided to check out first half/second half splits for certain players Haverdink didn’t come to mind. My initial focus was going to be on a few of the less experienced guys. So I fired off the first post on Tyler Dykstra* and was going to follow up with Jordan Mast, but one fact kept gnawing at me while looking through Mast’s numbers: despite better offensive numbers during the second half of the year, he saw a playing time reduction.

*The author is keenly aware that it has been well over two months since that post. Don’t judge him.

This fact didn’t make sense for two reasons. (1) As I stated above (and will show in a future post), Jordan’s offensive numbers took a big jump in the second half of the year, and (2) Mitch Vallie and Mickey DeVries each missed the entire second half of the year and David Rietema missed a few games as well. These three players don’t fit the exact Jordan Mast archetype, but you’d think that there would have been some position shifting involved that would force Mast (who even started four games) into more playing time. But that didn’t happen; Mast’s per-game average fell from 18 minutes to 14.8 minutes between the first 13 games and the second 13 games. So, yeah. I didn’t get it right away.

I didn’t really have a feel for this at the time, but Brian Haverdink’s minutes soared in the second half of the year. I mean, I knew he was re-inserted into the starting lineup just a few games into conference play, but I don’t know that it really struck me that he was getting so many more minutes than he received during most of the non-conference season. But he certainly was.


Some Numbers

22 -- Haverdink
G
GS
Min
MPG
1st Half
13
5
249
19.2
2nd Half
13
11
341
26.2
Total
26
16
590
22.7

Haverdink, who began the year in the starting lineup (and averaged more than 26 minutes for the first five games), was a victim of the Thanksgiving weekend rotation shakeup. He was sent to the bench in favor or Matt DeBoer (among other lineup/rotation moves) and received fewer than 13 minutes per game over the next six games (through the nightmare trip to the Pacific Northwest).

I can only imagine that this must have been a dark spot for Haverdink (in his senior year) on a personal level (though this would be pure speculation on my part), but it was a huge blow to the team as well. I’m not necessarily talking in the sense that Haverdink was a disappointment to the team (he was never going to be confused for a scoring champion), but the (somewhat illogical) hope from many fans (me) was that he was going to morph into a real three point threat for a team that otherwise had no strong three point options.
Then injury issues happened and eligibility issues happened, and Haverdink saw his playing time ratchet back up. And he took advantage.

Other Numbers

22 -- Haverdink
FG
FGA
Pct
2FG
2FGA
2 Pct
3FG
3FGA
3 Pct
FT
FTA
FT Pct
1st Half
16
61
0.262
8
27
0.296
8
34
0.235
6
6
1.000
2nd Half
26
68
0.382
8
22
0.364
18
46
0.391
12
18
0.667
Total
42
129
0.326
16
49
0.327
26
80
0.325
18
24
0.750

It’s not even the same player. One might turn their nose up at his .382 field goal percentage (and he still wasn’t all that effective inside the arc), but key to his second-half success was his stout .391 three point percentage. His second-half line was good for a .515 effective field goal percentage and 1.07 points per weighted shot. Both of which were above average for the team last season.

The difference in his offensive numbers from the first half of the year to the second half equated to nearly three points per game and two fewer shot attempts; so, since the team scored about one point per shot attempt, you could figure Haverdink added five points per game to the team with his elevated play down the stretch.

This is something I completely missed by focusing primarily on the season stats. Haverdink had dug himself an early hole, so his bottom line never looked great, but I never stopped to realize that he was a completely different player in January and February than he was in November and December.

Brian obviously won’t be suiting up for the Knights in 2012-13 so we really can’t take much of this information forward, but I thought it was important to highlight a senior who elevated his game to help will his team to a respectable second half finish.

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